Punched In: Can’t Look Away

Posted: April 1, 2013 in Arts, NCAAB
Tags: ,

Legacies: They can be about sweet triumphs, or forgettable fades into the sunset. Ebbs and flows, endings of vast unpredictability. This weekend seemed to leave a sweeping variety of all sorts of images and the impact on various legacies.

Sometimes, though, moments of initial or significant, repetitious poise in critical instances are fleeting when the final images are so vivid. And so, farewell Elijah Johnson.

I could have reminded all the Michigan fans who doubled as my good friends watching Friday night’s Sweet Sixteen tilt about how Johnson played well in three victories over Ohio State in the last two seasons. Or, if anyone had forgot, how he went NBA Jam at Iowa State this season in a victory that likely shouldn’t have been, but was with Johnson (and the referees).

When you’re a displaced, passionate fan, you’re often left singing more praises than criticisms of your team or program. Somehow, though, those extremes have been accentuated in some sort of Michigan-centric fashion since I’ve planted my feet in this soil. A heartbreaking first-round upset to Bradley at the Palace in 2006. The snuffing out of Steph Curry and Davidson’s run in 2008 at Ford Field en route to a National Championship.

Now, after Johnson’s final game as a Jayhawk in Friday night’s loss to Michigan, he’ll exit stage right remembered as a failure and a hack in these parts for the way he went out. I’m not so sure he’ll be remembered so favorably elsewhere, or in my own mind. I’m at least grateful that Kansas will get a chance to erase the stench that was left, unlike Johnson. Its legacy deserves better.

As for the immediate future, intrigue awaits for both programs in a similar fashion. Both are set to likely lose underclassmen as NBA Draft lottery picks, and even more as potential first-round picks in the case of Michigan. The pair are also bringing in very good recruiting classes and will be depending on some fresh blood to keep it rolling in 2013-2014. A familiar fate for the Jayhawks, and a new test for Michigan. I suspect either way they’ll be playing on the biggest Monday of the season.

Still relatively unknown, “GGG” is about to become a household name to even the casual boxing fans.

Hopefully the lasting legacy of this Michigan season is one that, like for Kansas in 2008, leaves everything else irrelevant in the wake of a title, this time one that will leave flags flying forever.

 

  • So many other lasting images from this weekend’s tourney games. Florida, who wiped away SEC opponents more handily than they did the memorable run of Florida Gulf Coast, got flushed as well quite handily in what ends somewhat of a less-than-memorable campaign. Wichita State’s victory, the first MVC team to reach this stage since the days of Larry Bird. And the sickening Kevin Ware injury. This season may not produce the richest crops in an NBA sense, but the storylines have still been there.
  • Saturday was so ripe with tourney action, it was easy to forget that its boxing action should have reminded the younger generation why it was a sport that put our fathers and their fathers on the edge of their seats. On pay-per-view, it was easy to miss another epic knockout from middleweight Gennady Golovkin, who put down Nobuhiro Ishida with impressive ease. If you’ve followed anything from me or our boxing talk on the radio, you know about “GGG” by now. But even the casual boxing fans are going to know the name soon. His style is like a fireworks finale, and now that he’s passed the test against legitimate competition, I’m betting a date with one of the top names in the division like Sergio Martinez could be on tap before the end of the calender year. As for Saturday night’s Rios-Alvarado II, if you haven’t already subscribed or re-newed HBO for “Game of Thrones”, here’s another reason. It gave March’s Bradley-Provodnikov bout some company in the Fight of the Year candidacy.
  • Speaking of, I won’t get around to watching the Season Three premiere of GoT until tomorrow, but its return couldn’t have come at a better or worse time, depending how you look at it. It couldn’t have lost the 9 p.m. ET slot, though, after what we got from the competing season finale of AMC’s “The Walking Dead.” The half-season has produced some great television, like the penultimate episode and “Clear,” and some very underwhelming ones which dwelt on a poorly-developed character in Andrea (and in some respects, the Governor) and seemed too static at times. Without subjecting myself to any spoilers, it became even clearer after talking to those who’ve read the graphic novels that the way the corresponding action has played out in the television series over the past episodes has been even more confounding. As I’ve told some friends, to expect the same level of consistency from TWD as we’ve seen from shows like GoT or “Mad Men,” which returns next Sunday, is to set yourself up for perpetual disappointment it seems.

 

Punched Out Radio returns this Friday at 4 p.m. ET. Plan to talk more TV, and of course look at the open of MLB season, so tune in. Play ball!

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